The Nazi Spy Ring in America

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256 pp., 6 x 9
Hardcover
ISBN: 9781647120047 (1647120047)


September 2020
Sales Rights: USP

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Table of Contents
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The Nazi Spy Ring in America
Hitler's Agents, the FBI, and the Case That Stirred the Nation
Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
The first full account of Nazi spies in 1930s America and how they were exposed.


In the mid-1930s just as the United States was embarking on a policy of neutrality, Nazi Germany launched a program of espionage against the unwary nation. The Nazi Spy Ring in America tells the story of Hitler's attempts to interfere in American affairs by spreading anti-Semitic propaganda, stealing military technology, and mapping US defenses.

This fast-paced history provides essential insight into the role of espionage in shaping American perceptions of Germany in the years leading up to US entry into World War II. Fascinating and thoroughly researched, The Nazi Spy Ring in America sheds light on a now-forgotten but significant episode in the history of international relations and the development of the FBI.

Using recently declassified documents, prize-winning historian Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones narrates this little-known chapter in US history. He shows how Germany's foreign intelligence service, the Abwehr, was able to steal top secret US technology such as a prototype codebreaking machine and data about the latest fighter planes.

At the center of the story is Leon Turrou, the FBI agent who helped bring down the Nazi spy ring in a case that quickly transformed into a national sensation. The arrest and prosecution of four members of the ring was a high-profile case with all the trappings of fiction: fast cars, louche liaisons, a murder plot, a Manhattan socialite, and a ringleader codenamed Agent Sex. Part of the story of breaking the Nazi spy ring is also the rise and fall of Turrou, whose talent was matched only by his penchant for publicity, which eventually caused him to run afoul of J. Edgar Hoover's strict codes of conduct.
Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones is emeritus professor of history at the University of Edinburgh. He has authored or edited fifteen books, including The FBI: A History, In Spies We Trust: The Story of Western Intelligence, and The CIA and American Democracy.
Reviews
"The 1938 Nazi spy affair was an event of world-historical significance. Here, an eminent intelligence historian, writing with tremendous verve and wit, tells the whole story for the first time, revealing a complex web of intrigue, sex, and betrayal."—Hugh Wilford, author of The Mighty Wurlitzer and America's Great Game



"Kidnapping plots, honey traps, ace detectives-this untold story of a Nazi espionage ring has all the elements of a good spy novel. Besides spinning a great yarn, Jeffreys-Jones also shows how the discovery and revelation of these plots had profound historical consequences for America's role in the world."—Kathryn Olmsted, professor of history, University of California, Davis



"This excellent history reads like a thriller and compels the reader from its first page to the last. By exposing the nefarious plans of Hitler's international spy network, Jeffreys-Jones makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of how World War II was fought in the shadows and reminds us that the plots, betrayals, murders, and mayhem of real life can rival the creations of the best Hollywood screenwriters."—Bradley W. Hart, author of Hitler's American Friends: The Third Reich's Supporters in the United States

Table of Contents
Preface

1. Lonkowski's Legacy

2. Jessie Jordan

3. Murder in the McAlpin

4. Enter Leon Turrou

5. Crown Identified

6. Tales of Hofmann

7. Avoiding a High Court Trial

8. What Griebl Knew

9. Miss Moog Says No

10. A Season of Inquiry

11. The Flight of the Spies

12. Blame Games

13. Dismissed with Prejudice

14. Seeking the Evidence

15. The Nazi Spy Trial

16. Of Propaganda and Revenge

17. Spy Sequels

18. The Case Named for Duquesne

19. Pfeiffer's Story

Dramatis Personae

Notes

Bibliography

Index