Third Sector Management

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248 pp., 6 x 9
Hardcover
ISBN: 9780878408436 (0878408436)

248 pp., 6 x 9
Paperback
ISBN: 9780878408443 (0878408444)

eBook
ISBN: 9781626165281

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March 2001
LC: 00-061024

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Description
Table of Contents


Third Sector Management
The Art of Managing Nonprofit Organizations
William B. Werther Jr. and Evan Berman

Trying to do good deeds does not guarantee that a nonprofit organization will succeed. The organization must do good deeds well. This textbook offers a blueprint for nonprofit success, adopting a strategic perspective that assumes vision, mission, strategy, and execution as the pillars upon which success is built.

While many experts on nonprofits argue that fundraising is the single key to success, William B. Werther Jr., and Evan M. Berman show that effective fundraising depends largely on how the nonprofit is positioned and how it performs. They address such issues as leadership and board development, strategic planning, staffing, fundraising, partnering, productivity improvement, and accountability.

Emphasizing the context of nonprofits and detailing improvements than can be made by managers at all levels, the book strikes a balance between policy discussion and practical usefulness. Written for use in graduate courses in nonprofit management, Third Sector Management will also be invaluable to directors, staff, volunteers, and board members of nonprofit organizations.


William B. Werther Jr. is a professor of management, Office Depot Management Scholar, and co-director of the Center for Nonprofit Management at the University of Miami.

Evan M. Berman is an associate professor of public administration at the University of Central Florida. Both have written widely on nonprofit management and have served as consultants to nonprofit organizations.

Table of Contents
Introduction

Part I: The Strategic Perspective and Players

1. The Third Sector
The Strategic Approach
Benefits of a Strategic Viewpoint
Limitations to a Strategic Viewpoint
The Life Cycle of Nonprofits
Operational Nonprofit Evolution
Nonprofit Leadership
Multiple Roles of Leaders
Nonprofit Boards
Leadership and Staffing
Strategic Execution
Plan of the Book
Conclusions
References


2. The Strategic View
Why Vision Matters
Vision-Directed Mission
Strategic Thinking
Environmental Evaluation of Nonprofits
Planning and Goal Setting
Pitfalls of Strategic Planning
Leadership Roles and Decision Making
Strategy and Structure
Conclusion
References


3. Board Development
Board Responsibilities
Board Involvement
Structured Board Involvement
Board Evaluation
Board Recruitment
Orienting and Integrating New Board Members
Board Renewal
Liabilities of Board Members
Conclusion
References


4. Strategic Leadership
Evolving Boundaries and Expectations
The CEO's Strategic Role
Long-Range Planning
Other Leadership Responsibilities
Conclusion
References


5. Staffing Nonprofits
Human Resource Information System
Staff Recruitment
Staff Selection
Staff Orientation
Training and Development
Staff Evaluation
Staff Compensation
Motivating Volunteers
Building a Human Organization
Conclusion
References


Part II: Strategic Execution

6. Nonprofit Productivity
When Less Is More
A Winning Attitude
Together We Can
A Little Leeway
Technology Management
The Accounting Approach
Conclusion
References


7. Evaluation and Accountability
Fundamentals of Evaluation
Performance Measurement
Data Collection
Organizational Evaluation
Conclusion
References


8. Building Bridges
Framework
Alliances among Nonprofits
Partnerships with Business
Becoming Like a Business
Alliances Involving Government
Conclusion
References


9. Fundraising
Strategic Linkages
Annual Giving Campaigns
Special Events
Major Giving
Grants
Conclusion
References


10. The Third Sector Reconsidered
Vision/Mission-Driven Nonprofits
The Strategic Connection
The Life Cycle of Nonprofits
The Success Triangle: Board, Leadership, Staff
Efficiency and Effectiveness
Alliances and Partnerships
The Great Funding Crisis
The Future of Nonprofits
The Golden Age of Nonprofits
Global Trends
Conclusion
References