U.S. Foreign Policy

American Power and Liberal Order

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan convinced many policymakers and scholars that the United States should pull back in international affairs and that restraint should guide grand strategy. Paul D.

Exporting Security

In this thoroughly updated second edition, Derek S. Reveron provides a comprehensive analysis of the shift in US foreign policy from coercive diplomacy to cooperative military engagement.

The National Security Enterprise

This second edition of The National Security Enterprise provides practitioners' insights into the operation, missions, and organizational cultures of the principal national security agencies

Cheap Threats

Why do weak states resist threats of force from the United States, especially when history shows that this superpower carries out its ultimatums?

The Future of Extended Deterrence

Are NATO's mutual security commitments strong enough today to deter all adversaries? Is the nuclear umbrella as credible as it was during the Cold War?

Assessing War

Today's protracted asymmetrical conflicts confuse efforts to measure progress, often inviting politics and wishful thinking to replace objective evaluation.

Mission Creep

Mission Creep: The Militarization of US Foreign Policy? examines the question of whether the US Department of Defense (DOD) has assumed too large a role in influencing and implementing US fo

Counterinsurgency Wars and the Anglo-American Alliance

Andrew Mumford challenges the notion of a "special relationship" between the United States and United Kingdom in diplomatic and military affairs, the most vaunted and, he says, exaggerated of assoc

The Indian Ocean and US Grand Strategy

The Indian Ocean, with its critical routes for global commerce, is a potentially volatile location for geopolitical strife.

NATO's Return to Europe

NATO's 2010 Strategic Concept officially broadened the alliance's mission beyond collective defense, reflecting a peaceful Europe and changes in alliance activities.

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