U.S. Foreign Policy

Safe from the battlefields of Europe and Asia, the United States led the post-World War II global economic recovery through international assistance and foreign direct investment.

The Indian Ocean, with its critical routes for global commerce, is a potentially volatile location for geopolitical strife.

As the NATO Alliance enters its seventh decade, it finds itself involved in an array of military missions ranging from Afghanistan to Kosovo to Sudan.

Recent breakdowns in American national security have exposed the weaknesses of the nation's vast overlapping security and foreign policy bureaucracy and the often dysfunctional interagency process.

Given U.S. focus on the continuing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, it is easy to miss that the military does much more than engage in combat.

As the world's largest polluter and its wealthiest country, the United States has a potentially enormous impact on international efforts to protect the environment.

By almost any measure, the United States is the most powerful nation in the history of civilization. Our resources are immense. But they are not limitless.

Ryan evaluates the nature and effectiveness of U.S. trade diplomacy with Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China in the 1970s and 1980s by examining the diplomatic strategies used by the U.S.

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