Interviews with Authors

Q&A with David L. Weimer, author of Medical Governance

Q: What inspired you to write this book?
Weimer: My work on this project began with a puzzle: Why would Congress delegate the
responsibility for developing rules for the allocation of transplant organs to the Organ Procurement
and Transplantation Network (OPTN), a non-governmental organization? Solving this puzzle led me
to the three questions that inspired me to write Medical Governance: How well does the OPTN balance
expertise, interests, and social values in its implementation of evidence-based medicine? What
features of the OPTN account for its success in doing so? And how might these features be employed
in other areas of medicine to promote evidence-based medicine?

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Q&A with Christopher J. Fettweis, author of Dangerous Times

Q: What prompted you to write this book?
Fettweis: I thought it was important to discuss the implications of the recent trends in international
security for the theory and practice of international politics. If it is true that the great powers have
essentially put war behind them, and if peace is trickling down to the smaller states, then the world
cannot remain unchanged. Sometimes recognition of fundamental change lags behind the reality; this
book is an attempt to speed the process along.

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Q&A with Robert Emmett Curran, author of A History of Georgetown University

Q: How did this book project come about?
Curran: It goes back to the 1960s when Georgetown was preparing to celebrate the 175th anniversary
of its founding. Then president Edward Bunn, SJ asked Father John Daley to write a history of the
university for the occasion. Daley had already written a history of Georgetown’s “early years” (1780s-
1820s), and agreed to add two more volumes that would bring the history up to the present.
Unfortunately, shortly afterwards, Daley was named regional superior of the Maryland Province of
the Society of Jesus. Father Joseph Durkin generously agreed to take up Daley’s work and complete a
second volume for the 175th. The result was Georgetown University: The Middle Years, which traced the
development of the university from the 1840s to the turn of the century, published in 1963.

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Q&A with John D. Ciorciari, author of The Limits of Alignment

Q: Why do the alignments of developing countries matter?
Ciorciari: The way developing countries tilt can have a significant effect on international security and
politics. Third World alignments affected the course of the Cold War, as many developing countries
leaned toward the Soviet Union to counter U.S. influence, while others became crucial U.S. allies in
places like the Persian Gulf. Developing country choices will also influence international relations
going forward as the United States, China, and other major powers compete for leadership and
influence. These alignments affect regional power balances and stability and collectively have a major
effect on the systemic correlation of forces between the great powers.

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Q&A with Donald P. Haider-Markel, author of Out and Running

Q: What made you want to write this book?
Haider-Markel: Most of my research on the policy process has been focused on the role of interest
groups and public opinion. In the course of many different studies it became clear to me that I was
downplaying the role of legislators and in particular legislators who had inordinate influence on the
success of legislation. After an early attempt to understand the influence of openly gay and lesbian
legislators on the adoption of domestic partner laws at the local level, I set out to not only examine the
influence of gay and lesbian legislators in state policymaking, but to also understand the dynamics at
play in the election of gay and lesbian state legislative candidates.

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Q&A with Derek S. Reveron, author of Exporting Security

Q: In the book, you make the assertion that exporting security has become more important for the
U.S. than exporting democracy. Why do you think this is the case?

Reveron: Simply, without security, democratization and development are not possible. In too many
countries, sub-national groups like gangs or illicit traffickers out-man and out-gun governments that
lack the capacity to provide security for development and access to global markets.

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Q&A with with Julie Rubio, author of Family Ethics: Practices for Christians

Q: What made you want to write this book?
Rubio: Ever since I can remember, I’ve been thinking about what it means to live a good life and how the good life for Christians might be different from the middle class norm. After college, I spent some time living and working in a shelter for homeless families run by a married couple with four kids. But most Christian married couples I knew were living pretty much like everyone else around them. I started to think about how family life might look if more people questioned the status quo.

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